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  • Our professional team

    Our team has over the years established a common trust with our partners to handle congresses, sport events and incentive groups of all sizes.

     

     

  • Highlight Tour

    If you are seeking the best way to enjoy Santorini and discover the island’s beauty, our daily excursions are a must for you! Our tour starts at 11:30 and ends at 18:00 including transfers from/to our meeting points, wine tasting and guided tour inside the pre-historic town.

    The tour will start from the traditional village of Pyrgos . “Pyrgos” means tower and consists of houses built around a Venetian Castle. From the hilltop of the village you can see the ruins of one of the five castles of the island, known as castle Kasteli.(40 min stop) click on image and read more about..

     

     

redbeach(Approximately 7 hrs)

Our tour starts with a visit to the Historical and Cultural Archaeological Museum of Santorini which contains artifacts from excavations on the island. It was built in 1960 by the Ministry of Public Works in order to replace the old museum (built in 1902), that had collapsed during the earthquake of 1956. Noteworthy are a fine collection of geometric red and black vases from the fifth century BC Inscriptions are plentiful among the displays in the museum and a certain amount of Minoan ware is also on exhibit. 

  1. Archaeological or Prehistoric Museum in Fira- Pyrgos-Akrotiri-Red beach-Black beach (Perissa)
  2. Archaeological or Prehistoric Museum in Fira- Imerovigli-Oia-Winery-Kamari
  3. Profitis Ilias-Pyrgos-Winery-Megalohori-Red Beach-Akrotiri-Black Beach Perissa

Our tour starts with a visit to the Historical and Cultural Archaeological Museum of Santorini which contains artifacts from excavations on the island. It was built in 1960 by the Ministry of Public Works in order to replace the old museum (built in 1902), that had collapsed during the earthquake of 1956. Noteworthy are a fine collection of geometric red and black vases from the fifth century BC Inscriptions are plentiful among the displays in the museum and a certain amount of Minoan ware is also on exhibit. The museum also hosts impressive frescoes as well as sculptures of the Hellenistic period, Byzantine works of art and even some remains of prehistoric times.

Prehistoric Museum : The exhibition is structured in four units, referring to the history of research at Thera, the geology of Thera, the island's history from the Late Neolithic to the Late Cycladic I periond (early 17th century B.C.) and the heyday of the city at Akrotiri (mature Late Cycladic I period, 17th century B.C.). In the last unit, in particular, various aspects are presented, such as the plan and architecture of the city and its organization as an urban centre, the emergent bureaucratic system, the development of the monumental art of wall-painting, the rich and diverse pottery repertoire, the elegant jewellery, the reciprocal influences between vase-painting and wall-painting, and the city's and the island's complex network of contacts with the outside word.
The exhibits include fossils of plants that flourished before the human habitation of Thera and archaeological objects. Among the earliest pieces are Neolithic pottery, Early Cycladic marble figurines, Early Cycladic pottery, including interesting pieces of the transitional phase from Late Cycladic II to Late Cycladic III period (Kastri group) from the Christiana islets and Akrotiri (3300-2000 B.C.) -Middle Cycladic pottery with a series of impressive bird jugs, many of them decorated with swallows - from Ftellos, Megalochori and Akrotiri (20th-18th century B.C.), and Early Cycladic metal artefacts from the last two sites.
The exhibition endeavours to sketch the course of Thera in prehistoric times, through selected finds from the thousands in the storerooms. This was a dynamic and creative course which established the city at Akrotiri as one of the most important Aegean centres during the 18th and 17th centuries B.C.

In Pyrgos can found at the highest point of Santorini, with panoramic views of the whole island all the way to the village of Oia. This hillside village was declared a protected settlement in 1995.
A typical Fortress Settlement of Cyclades. On the hilltop we can find ruins of Kasteli Castle, one of the five 'kastelia' on the island.
Traditional architecture, remains of neo-classical mansions, narrow winding paths leading up the hillside, small white houses, galleries, vineyards, churches, breathtaking sunsets ...
If we make our way up from the main square towards the mansion of Zannos Melathron and up, you will discover one or two wonderful hillside cafes from which you can sip on a glass of wine and breathe in the sunsets and the panoramic views.

Perissa : The longest dark sand endless beach. A feature that makes Perissa unique, besides the crystal water and the smooth sand, is the fact that is the most protected beach from the summer Aegean winds.

Imerovigli village: The name of this village belongs to the days of the pirates: vigla (Latin= vigilare= To Guard or to Act as a Look Out & imera (Greek) = day. Imerovigli has been declared as a Traditional Settlement, and special rules and regulations have been enforced regarding buildings’ development.
Its’ position at the highest, most central part of the caldera gave it visual command of the whole area. It also derived its importance from its proximity to Skaros Fortress. The Church of the Panagia Malteza has a marvelous carved wooden screen with icons depicting scenes from the Old Testament. Imerovigli has views of the volcano, breathtaking sunsets and tranquility. There is a main square which leads up to the Caldera and the traditional hillside cave settlements. The largest part of Imerovigli was destroyed in the 1956 volcano eruption. Some of the population perished, while others moved away to the mainland. Imerovigli has since then been restored and has some of the most beautiful hotels and traditional cave house settlements on the island.

Oia is a traditional settlement in the north of Santorini. The village is approximately 150 meters above sea level. Oia was severely damaged in the 1956 earthquake and much work has been involved to implement its restoration. The beauty of Oia is unsurpassed. In fact, it is almost impossible to describe in words. Small white houses, tier the hillside, interspersed by splashes of rich okra, deep fuchsia, cobalt blue, oyster pink and earthy red. Oia is one of the most photographed places in Greece. It has inspired artists, poets and every visitor who visits Santorini. Oia is best known for breathtaking sunsets; if truth be told, sunrise in Oia is also magical. In Oia there are two types of dwellings, the cave houses dug into the volcanic rock on the Caldera cliffs, and the Captains houses. The cave houses used to be the homes of ship crews, whereas the Captains houses belonged to the affluent class of ship owners. Many of the churches in Oia were dedicated to sailors.

Wine Promotion Center:
A quided tour in SantoWines winery, where one can see the whole wine making process, from the moment of grape pressing up to bottling.
A visit to the aging cellars where one can feel the atmosphere created from the combination of the barrels wood with the wine which is in the process of aging.
A taste of wines. Specialized enologists give away the wine's hidden secrets, while the visitors may taste and get to know the various types of company's famous wines.

Profitis Ilias : the highest point on Santorini and spans to 1,856 feet at the summit. From here you can see the surrounding islands and, on a clear day, the mountains of Crete, more than 100 km (66 mi) away.

At a distance of 10 klm far from Fira at the Southwest, it is found Megalochori. Its name in greek means "big village". Typical traditional cycladic houses, neoclassic buildings and small houses dug in the volcanic rock blend together with harmony. We find here also the typical small white churches, some of them with their blue domes.

Akrotiri:
It is one of the most important prehistoric settlements of the Aegean. The first habitation at the site dates from the Late Neolithic times (at least the 4th millenium B.C.). During the Early Bronze Age (3rd millenium B.C.), a sizeable settlement was founded and in the Middle and early Late Bronze Age (ca. 20th-17th centuries B.C.) it was extended and gradually developed into one of the main urban centres and ports of the Aegean. The large extent of the settlement (ca. 20 hectares), the elaborate drainage system, the sophisticated multi-storeyed buildings with the magnificent wall-paintings, furniture and vessels, show its great development and prosperity. The various imported objects found in the buildings indicate the wide network of its external relations. Akrotiri was in contact with Crete but also communicated with the Greek Mainland, the Dodecanese, Cyprus, Syria and Egypt. The town's life came to an abrupt end in the last quarter of the 17th century B.C. when the inhabitants were obliged to abandon it as a result of severe earthquakes. The erruption followed. The volcanic materials covered the entire island and the town itself. These materials, however, have protected up to date the buildings and their contents, just like in Pompei.

Red beach: Close to the excavation site of Akrotiri you will find the most famous beach on the island, the Red Beach. What makes the beach absolutely irresistible is its impressive red rock formations, which form a breathtaking unique volcanic landscape.

Kamari : is a black volcanic beach fully organised offering a wide range of facilities like sunbeds, umbrellas and various types of water sports.


Kindly note that not include in the price

Wine Tasting
Tour to the Cave
Entrance fees of museum/archaeological sites
Guide

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